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RestaurantsLondonMaryleboneW1

Breaking news

October 2020: JKS Restaurants has launched (from Friday 16 October) the Ambassador General Store (ambassadorgeneralstore.com), offering home delivery 'ready-to-cook' kits nationwide from Gymkhana, Trishna and Brigadiers, as well as a pantry of goodies.

survey result

Summary

£88
 ££££
4
Very Good
3
Good
3
Good
* Based on a three course dinner, half a bottle of wine, coffee, cover charge, service and VAT.

“Original, flavour-packed and utterly delicious” – the cuisine at Karam Sethi’s original Marylebone venture (the first in the JKS stable) is a fine homage to the Mumbai venue from which it takes its name, and even if “sister-restaurant Gymkhana has the edge” nowadays, it remains one of the capital’s top Indian destinations. It’s “really buzzy when full” (to an extent one or two reporters find “disturbing” of enjoyment).

Summary

£83
 ££££
4
Very Good
2
Average
2
Average
* Based on a three course dinner, half a bottle of wine, coffee, cover charge, service and VAT.

The Sethi family’s original London venture – this “low-key”-looking, ten-year-old recreation of a famous Mumbai venue, in Marylebone, is beginning to show its age a little. Fans still tout its “exquisitely prepared and not over-spiced cuisine”, as “the best in fine-end Indian dining” and on a par with its now more high-profile sibling, Gymkhana. But ratings here slid noticeably across the board in this year’s survey, amidst gripes about “rather sporadic service” and food that’s “starting to feel a mite unexciting nowadays”. Is their empire finally showing growing pains?

Summary

£83
 ££££
5
Exceptional
3
Good
3
Good
* Based on a three course dinner, half a bottle of wine, coffee, cover charge, service and VAT.

“Even better than its slightly more glamorous sibling Gymkhana”; the Sethi family’s “exceptional” Mumbai import delivers “memorably gorgeous” cuisine (most famously fish) with “lovely subtle flavours and a deft touch to the spicing”. Only the food is a stand-out however: in other respects “it looks and feels like an easygoing Marylebone restaurant”.

Summary

£76
 ££££
5
Exceptional
3
Good
3
Good
* Based on a three course dinner, half a bottle of wine, coffee, cover charge, service and VAT.

“Exciting, well-crafted, deft… balanced in terms of spicing and heat” – such are the “assured culinary delights” featuring “extremely unusual ingredients” at the Sethi family’s original Marylebone venture, that made it London’s No. 1 nouvelle Indian this year. When busy, it can seem “noisy” and “cramped”, and service “slightly rushed”.

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Have you eaten at Trishna?

Restaurant details

Highchair, Menu
Yes
12
80

Trishna Restaurant Diner Reviews

Reviews of Trishna Restaurant in W1, London by users of Hardens.com. Also see the editors review of Trishna restaurant.
Douglas M
Absolutely first rate experience in every w...
Reviewed 7 months, 14 days ago

"Absolutely first rate experience in every way. The tasting menu is to die for, and I strongly for couples who eat meat to have one with meat and one vegetarian, it's the perfect balance. Wines are exquisite. Not cheap, be completely unforgettable. Ask for the second, back room, which is more intimate, homely and relaxing."

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Prices

Availability 2 courses 3 courses coffee included service included
Dinner   £65.00
Pretheatre   £32.00
Drinks  
Wine per bottle £21.00
Filter Coffee £3.00
Extras  
Service 12.50%

Harden's says...

Trishna W1

A chef who trained with Vineet Bhattia produces many dishes of very high quality at this Marylebone Indian - an offshoot, not that you'd know to look at it, of a famous establishment in Mumbai; the devotion to portion-control, however, sometimes verges on absurd.


We don't make any apology for the fact that, like most people who write restaurant reviews in this country, we generally base our views on a single meal. It's mainly in the US, where they take these things much more seriously, that some newspapers have a three-visit rule. (The leading American critic recently told us that he often doesn't find that enough!)


There's much to be said for the earnestness of the US model, but restaurants can drift over time, and it's arguable just how much effort (and money) it really makes sense to put in to appraising a restaurant very definitely at one single point in time (especially if that's just after opening).


What we do try to do, however, is to give a fair indication of what it is we've sampled, so people can work out for themselves how much weight they wish to place on our judgments. And at the moment, with an unusually large number of restaurants to cover, and budgets to be observed, the sampling is often the set lunch.


We believe that even a set lunch tells you pretty much as much about a restaurant as you'll ever get out of a single visit. The ambience of a restaurant is the same, of course, whether you're having a feast or a snack. And the service doesn't change much either. (And if you see that your plutocratic neighbours are being treated much better than you are? Well that's a really bad sign.)


It's only on the food front, then - a major part of the experience, but only a part - that there's really any apparent difference for lunchtime cheapskates. But even then, the difference is more apparent than real. Many of the touchstone features of a cheap meal are identical with that of an expensive one - bread and coffee are the same for all.


Often, of course, the set menu dishes are just a selection from the à la carte anyway. So it was on our visit to this new Marylebone Indian, which is an offshoot of a famous seafood establishment in Mumbai. (It's almost best not to know this before you go. The general impression is not especially Mumbaiesque - think contemporary take on whitewashed brick English wine bar, circa 1980 - and the bias towards seafood is not that pronounced.)


So what do we actually observe? Well, the first point that's starkly obvious here is that everything we taste of a fishy nature is beautifully spiced and presented. Given that the chef here, Ravi Deulkar, used to work with Vineet Bhatia, that's no great surprise. On our small sampling, the food here seemed well up to Bhattia standards. Chilli squid parata to start, for example, was superb.


But the overwhelming impression, sadly, was of meanness. The fish main course from the set menu was so small that it could easily have been served in a tapas bar. Now you can get some pretty good deals in London for £17.50 at the moment, so the paucity of fish was quite striking. But the real problem was that all that came with it was, perhaps, four (nicely spiced) cherry tomatoes, chopped up. No rice. No nan. No little dish of dahl. Absolutely nothing to round out the experience.


When we politely enquired if that really was it, the (very charming) waiter had the decency to look a little embarrassed, and volunteered to go and get some nan. As it never arrived - you can only spend so long eating five mouthfuls of fish - we never got to see if it would have been 'thrown in' or not.


A sweet rice pudding, otherwise unexciting, provided at least some warmth and comfort, before we ventured out into the cold afternoon.


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15-17 Blandford St, London, W1U 3DG
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Opening hours
Monday12 pm‑2:30 pm, 6 pm‑10:30 pm
Tuesday12 pm‑2:30 pm, 6 pm‑10:30 pm
Wednesday12 pm‑2:30 pm, 6 pm‑10:30 pm
Thursday12 pm‑2:30 pm, 6 pm‑10:30 pm
Friday12 pm‑2:30 pm, 6 pm‑10:30 pm
Saturday12 pm‑2:30 pm, 5:30 pm‑10:30 pm
Sunday12 pm‑2:45 pm, 5:30 pm‑9:45 pm

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