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RestaurantsLondonSohoW1

survey result

Summary

This “special” Soho veteran “continues to delight and surprise”, under the Hart Bros, whose sure-handed stewardship of the property is in stark contrast to when it lost its way in the Marco Pierre White years. Despite a reformatting a year ago which left its premises “somewhat truncated” (to make space for a branch of Barrafina) the dining room remains “totally charming”. “When chef Jeremy Lee is at his best there is no comparison for simple excellence” and his “perfectly poised, thoughtful and considered” seasonal British comfort food is provided with “originality and flair” to create a culinary experience that’s “reliable without ever being predictable”“and you also get the best martini in town”. Top Tip: breakfast: “Jeremy’s golden eggs, exquisite bread, gently roasted tomatoes...there is no better way to start the day”.

£60
  £££
4
Very Good
4
Very Good
5
Exceptional
* Based on a three course dinner, half a bottle of wine, coffee, cover charge, service and VAT.

Summary

“Benefitting from its reduction in size to accommodate Barrafina’s move from Frith Street, QV is now more intimate” than it was before, and the ground floor of the Hart Bros’ Soho classic also feels even more “relaxed and convivial”, aided by its “sublimely attentive, yet also informal staff”. Appreciation for Jeremy Lee’s cuisine has stepped up a notch too – “sensational British food using the best seasonal produce”.

£60
  £££
4
Very Good
5
Exceptional
5
Exceptional
* Based on a three course dinner, half a bottle of wine, coffee, cover charge, service and VAT.

Summary

Just as it was hitting a “really special” stride, it’s all change at the Hart Bros’ Soho veteran (hence we’ve left it un-rated). From autumn 2016, much of the ground floor is set to become a branch of their Barrafina brand. The remainder of the ground floor, the ex-bar, will continue as Quo Vadis, while with echoes of The Ivy, chef Jeremy Lee will refocus more of his efforts on a new dining room within the Quo Vadis members’ club (which occupies the floors above).

£56
   ££
* Based on a three course dinner, half a bottle of wine, coffee, cover charge, service and VAT.

Summary

Under the Hart Bros, this well-known Soho veteran is really on song, and the “particularly charming” staff contribute to the “bag-loads of character” in its “bright, spacious and gloriously flower-filled” dining room; Jeremy Lee’s food is “not centre stage” but “unfussy, un-showy and very capable”.

£56
   ££
3
Good
5
Exceptional
4
Very Good
* Based on a three course dinner, half a bottle of wine, coffee, cover charge, service and VAT.

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Restaurant details

Yes
Highchair
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32, 12
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Quo Vadis Restaurant Diner Reviews

Reviews of Quo Vadis Restaurant in W1, London by users of Hardens.com. Also see the editors review of Quo Vadis restaurant.
Jin L
Simple food, well cooked. Friendly service....
Reviewed 5 months, 26 days ago

"Simple food, well cooked. Friendly service. Good portions and outstanding chips! Door lady perhaps needs a bit of training - brusque and not too welcoming"

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Paul F
It’s quite a quirky place. Centrally posi...
Reviewed 7 months, 4 days ago

"It’s quite a quirky place. Centrally positioned and easily accessible. Phoned to change my booking as my meeting ended early, reception was very accommodating.o when I arrived I was the first customer, I believe there are two dining rooms though I only saw one. Staff are very efficient and helpful and answered my menu questions. The menu reflects the quirkiness and doesn’t have a huge choice, but what was there was great. Started with a fascinating wild duck with damson which was unusual but superb. Main was a whole partridge with accompanying vegetables. I had forgotten how hard it is to bone the bird, but it was well cooked and presented. Dessert menu was a challenge as there were 4-5 I wanted! Ended up with the profiteroles, brpeautiful pastry with lovely filling and well flavoured sauce. Toilets were spotless, but take your climbing gear it’s up a number of stairs Great visit saw chef patron a couple fbtimes but sadly didn’t get to meet him despite hints to that end. Well worth the visit."

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Nick P
Good and interesting dishes and wines, fine...
Reviewed 11 months, 20 days ago

"Good and interesting dishes and wines, fine cocktails; service occasionally over-attentive and over-familiar; bustling, fun vibe."

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Harden's says...

Quo Vadis W1

Inspired by the grand hotel grill restaurants of yore, a decidedly English re-launch of the long-established Soho restaurant; the straightforwardness of the formula arguably risks tipping into a general lack of excitement, but it's a plush and welcoming place, with quality, no-nonsense fare.


With only two very long-established obvious exceptions (Wiltons SW1 and Rules WC2), long-running London restaurants, except in hotels, are generally never English. In Soho, in particular, the tradition was long for Italian restaurants, and it was just such an establishment that Peppino Leoni launched in 1926. The premises - originally called Leoni's Quo Vadis - have generally traded (except, briefly, under MPW's management) with an Italian slant ever since.


Until now that is. Brothers Sam and Eddie Hart - known for their two grand and successful tapas bars, Fino W1 and Barrafina W1 - have decided to give us a full-blown English restaurant for once, taking inspiration from hotel grill restaurants of yore. Perhaps it's something to do with having grown up in an hotel (Mama and Papa Hart own and run Rutland's plush Hambleton Hall).


The result is an elegant room, traditionally decorated and appointed (albeit with some modern artworks). Cloths are white linen. Cutlery is - all too rare - English. This is no '30s pastiche, but the tables probably would not have looked so different 70 years ago. Or, to put it another way, the general impression is akin to that at the recently launched grill at Brown's Hotel (The Albemarle), albeit on a less swanky scale.


The food similarly bespeaks a straightforward and very English approach. In fact, although we don't particularly go a bundle on 'fancy' food, we found ourselves scanning the menu for much that could really be called cooking. The menu is largely composed of simple, unadorned protein. Oysters, beef, salmon, turbot, lamb' Even qualified, the descriptions rarely need many words. (In fact, we wouldn't have minded a few more evocations of provenance and so on; the description 'Cheese', in particular, is direct to a point bordering on unhelpfulness.)


Dishes are cooked and presented to as high a standard as one could hope, and portions are generous. The aim is admirably simple. If there's a gripe, it's that prices are sufficiently high that perhaps one might expect more.


Our main courses of turbot and salmon were both done to a turn. Sides of chips, tomato salad and spinach were all of a high standard. A starter of tomato essence with crayfish - one of the menu's most complicated dishes, as it turned out - was very deftly realised. Foie gras terrine perhaps a little less so. Puddings - tarts of chocolate and treacle - were good without being earth-shattering, as was filter coffee.


Service is friendly and, generally, efficient, although in these early days there were occasional longeurs. We did feel, however, that at these sort of prices the staff should have known who was having what.


The cover charge of £2 - a rarity nowadays - turns out to be very reasonable value, comprising as it does filtered water (we quite liked the sparkling), olives (unremarkable) and bread (very good, baked in-house). Not everyone likes cover charges, but we can't help feeling that they're infinitely preferable to being sold every extra.


Overall, then, this is a thoroughly good place, if one that - for us - fell short of excitement. It certainly has a handy location, and will be useful for business entertaining, and the more grown-up sort of pre- and post-theatre dining. And, for those who just can't get enough of it, the charming club above - aimed at Soho's movers and shakers - is still taking applications for membership.


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26-29 Dean St, London, W1D 3LL
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Opening hours
Monday8 am-2:30 pm, 5:30 pm-10:30 pm
Tuesday8 am-2:30 pm, 5:30 pm-10:30 pm
Wednesday8 am-2:30 pm, 5:30 pm-10:30 pm
Thursday8 am-2:30 pm, 5:30 pm-10:30 pm
Friday8 am-2:30 pm, 5:30 pm-10:30 pm
Saturday12 pm-2:30 pm, 5:30 pm-10:30 pm
SundayCLOSED

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