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RestaurantsLondonPiccadillyW1

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June 2020: Reopening post-COVID on July 4.

survey result

Summary

£45
   ££
2
Average
3
Good
5
Exceptional
* Based on a three course dinner, half a bottle of wine, coffee, cover charge, service and VAT.

“You’ll be so dazzled by the place that you may be inclined to overlook the food” – Corbin & King’s “improbably glamorous” recreation of an “archetypal buzzing Parisian brasserie” is “so handy, being just by Piccadilly Circus tube” and provides “unmistakable value for such opulent and elegant surroundings in the very centre of London”. The “huge”, Grade I listed chamber is an “amazing Art Deco underground ballroom”; “a wonderfully blingy, brightly-lit space with gold everywhere”. The “straightforward” French brasserie fare (soupe à l’oignon, boeuf bourguignon, steak haché…) from a huge menu is mundane by comparison… in fact it’s pretty mundane full stop. But whereas the odd critic brands results as “terrible”, most reporters feel that “you’d have to be a miserable sod to complain about anything at these prices”“inevitably there are slips along the way and food can be inconsistent, but you get more bang for your buck here than at virtually any other London restaurant” (in particular “prix-fixe menus are astonishing value”). Top Tip – “there is also a beautiful Bar Americain”.

Summary

£41
    £
1
Poor
3
Good
5
Exceptional
* Based on a three course dinner, half a bottle of wine, coffee, cover charge, service and VAT.

“Worth a visit just to look at the main salon” – Corbin & King’s “improbably glamorous and huge”, Grade I-listed, Art Deco basement is “an extraordinary space that dazzles every newcomer”; and “so handy, being just by Piccadilly Circus tube”. “It was a great concept of C & K to try and re-create a proper Parisian brasserie, with menu to match”, and by and large they’ve succeeded. But even some of its greatest fans (of which there are bazillions) would admit that the trade-off is mightily “indifferent” traditional fare and service – which though improved this year – can still be “patchy”. Don’t be put off though: especially if you’re counting the pennies, its low, low prices make it a total “bargain” in the heart of the West End. Top Tips – the set menu is “limited” but “excellent value”. Also, “the amazing ’30s-style American Bar, and small nightclub called ‘The Crazy Coqs’!” (Final note for style anoraks: if you want to be pernickety, “while the basement is genuine Art Deco, the main dining room itself is actually more flamboyant neo-classical. Its only ‘real’ Art Deco elements are the splendid ceiling lights, added during the last refurbishment.”)

Summary

£40
    £
1
Poor
3
Good
5
Exceptional
* Based on a three course dinner, half a bottle of wine, coffee, cover charge, service and VAT.

“Why bother with any restaurant chain when you can actually eat here cheaper and get the Corbin & King experience on a budget!” Their “breathtaking refurbishment of the Regent Palace Hotel’s Art Deco basement grill room” provides a “dramatic and unexpected setting in a fantastic location, just off Piccadilly Circus”, that’s “very evocative of a true Parisian brasserie” (“democratic and wonderful!”). The trade-off is the “conveyor-belt” classic brasserie fare which can utterly “lack spark”, but even so “at these prices you can’t go wrong”. Top Menu Tips – “stick to the classics like steak haché” or the “incredible value set options”.

Summary

£40
    £
1
Poor
3
Good
5
Exceptional
* Based on a three course dinner, half a bottle of wine, coffee, cover charge, service and VAT.

For “glamour on-the-cheap”, nowhere matches Corbin & King’s “so dazzling”, gilded Art Deco basement – “an approximation to a huge Paris brasserie” just seconds from Piccadilly Circus, where “keen prices for this location” amount to “unbeatable value”. It is a trade-off though – service can be “rushed” and the brasserie fodder is “so mediocre”.

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Have you eaten at Brasserie Zédel?

Restaurant details

Highchair, Portions
450

Brasserie Zédel Restaurant Diner Reviews

Reviews of Brasserie Zédel Restaurant in W1, London by users of Hardens.com. Also see the editors review of Brasserie Zédel restaurant.
finian k
It was 35 minutes before our food order was...
Reviewed 11 months, 1 day ago

"It was 35 minutes before our food order was taken and of course at the end they were rushing us to get the table back. Food just ok, but we had fun overall. Prices v keen, including the wine. "

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Prices

Availability 2 courses 3 courses coffee included service included
Always £10.50 £13.75

Traditional European menu

Starter Main Veggies Pudding
£7.00 £17.50 £3.50 £6.75
Drinks  
Wine per bottle £23.50
Filter Coffee £3.00
Extras  
Service 15.00%

Harden's says...

Brasserie Zédel W1

Near Piccadilly Circus, a vast subterranean space re-created by the owners of the Wolseley as an authentic Gallic brasserie on a huge scale; value is quite reasonable, but we are not convinced the formula really 'works'.


Many regular visitors to Paris will have their own favourite brasserie - a sort of home-from-home in the City of Light. Reliable, full of character, comforting, not too grand, not too pricey, (relatively) democratic' - this list of the concept's virtues is almost endless.


It really is a hard act to imitate, but if anyone could pull it off, the 'Ivy boys' (as they were once known), Christopher Corbin and Jeremy King, are the people to do it. Their Wolseley, though billed as mitteleuropean in inspiration, is perhaps - spiritually speaking - the closest thing London has to your grander sort of Parisian brasserie.


It is no coincidence that the Wolseley occupies a building which has more than hint of the Belle Epoque about it. Not so the home of their latest, and most audacious project yet, Brasserie Zédel - a magnificently restored marbled (basement) room on a scale hardly ever seen in London.


And here the problems start. It's just 'wrong'. Brasseries are Belle Epoque-to-Thirties, and the inherited style of this room is very definitely neo-classical. It doesn't help that the fussy capitals of the columns have been gilded to within an inch of their lives, and then spot-lit: this contributes to an overall impression somewhat akin to the Great Hall of the People, recently made over by the best interior designer in Ruritania.


That's not, we suspect, the aim. They've spent an absolute fortune on, for example, really beautiful '30s-style light fittings. But these just don't gel with the fixed elements of the room. And that matters. Your classic brasserie is an all-of-a-period whole-greater-than-sum-of-parts - what the Germans more catchily call a Gesamtkunstwerk - and this isn't.


There are other things which jar, too. Although the tablecloths are paper - homage, it seems, to Chartier, the famously cheap, jam-packed workmen's dining hall in the 2ème - the waiters here decrumb before pudding. Well, chaps, which is it? Is this a democratic dining hall à la Chartier (where they write your order straight on to the 'cloth'), or are you aiming to offer a downscale version of dinner at the Crillon? This place just doesn't seem to know where it really stands.


In defence of the establishment - which, we should say, we were really hoping was going to become our new central London stand-by - it should be noted that prices are pretty reasonable. Or at least intermittently so - an all-in menu for £20, including coffee and a glass of wine, is clearly a useful thing to have, a few yards from Piccadilly Circus.


Twelve pounds for half a dozen fairly small oysters is not, however, a special bargain. And here again, there's something not quite right. There's a correct way for a Parisian brasserie to serve oysters (on a stand). Any other ways is just wrong.


Against which it must be said that some of the food is good. A steak, albeit quite a small one, came very nicely cooked, and the chips were not bad either. A marmite de poissons was tasty, but - perhaps of necessity - felt very portion-controlled. A pâtisserie item, which seemed rather a bargain for pudding, just tasted a bit cheap.


Can these problems all be cured when the settling-in is done? We do fear the problem is intrinsic: we're not sure that there's a place in the market for a large establishment that's too grand to be truly cheap, and too cheap to be truly grand.


We do hope, though, that we're wrong. There's so much care (and money) evidently gone in to this that it gives us no pleasure to record our early-days view that this is a really brave concept which doesn't - in the final analysis - really quite work.


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20 Sherwood St, London, W1F 7ED
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Opening hours
Monday11:30 am‑12 am
Tuesday11:30 am‑12 am
Wednesday11:30 am‑12 am
Thursday11:30 am‑12 am
Friday11:30 am‑12 am
Saturday11:30 am‑12 am
Sunday11:30 am‑11 pm

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