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Summary

“It seriously makes me doubt the Michelin rating system” – the world-famous Gallic chef’s Mayfair venture is “not in the same league as the Waterside Inn or Fat Duck” yet inexplicably retains its 3-star top billing. Admittedly, many reports do advocate this hotel dining room’s “discreetly opulent surroundings”, its “courteous” staff and its “awesome” cuisine, but far too many sceptics say it’s “waaaayyyyyyy overpriced” for “muted” food that’s “nice but not a wow”, and find the luxurious interior rather “soulless”.

£134
Average
Average
Average
* Based on a three course dinner, half a bottle of wine, coffee, cover charge, service and VAT.

Summary

“3 stars .... not in my eyes!” – Michelin continue to mis-rate the world-famous Gallic chef’s Mayfair temple. True, fans do wax lyrical over its “easy luxury” and cuisine with “perfect balance”, and the “un-snooty” service in particular is “exceptional”. But there are too many doubters who find it feels “corporate” with “inspiration-free” cooking, and “you need to bring ALL your money!”

£129
Average
Very Good
Good
* Based on a three course dinner, half a bottle of wine, coffee, cover charge, service and VAT.

Summary

“Never a three-star!” – the Gallic über-chef’s foodie temple in Mayfair is just “not up to par”; OK, a minority of fans are duly wowed, but for a sizeable majority its “Michelin-by-numbers” cuisine, “characterless” style and ferocious prices create a “distinctly average” experience.

£126
Average
Average
Average
* Based on a three course dinner, half a bottle of wine, coffee, cover charge, service and VAT.

Summary

“How this got three Michelin stars, I really don’t know!” – the tyre man’s enduring esteem for the Gallic über-chef’s “bland foodie temple” in Mayfair – with its “unchallenging and stratospherically overpriced” food – is quite unfathomable; on the plus-side, however, the all-in set lunch is “a steal”.

£121
Average
Good
Average
* Based on a three course dinner, half a bottle of wine, coffee, cover charge, service and VAT.

Have you eaten at Alain Ducasse at The Dorchester?

Restaurant details

Yes
7, 12, 30
9.30 pm
Jacket required
82
10
Yes

Harden's says...

Alain Ducasse, Dorchester, W1

A swish but surprisingly comforting addition to the über-chef's international empire, this very Gallic Mayfair dining room offers a surprisingly unintimidating haute-cuisine experience, that's highly enjoyable (if, of course, extremely expensive).


Other early reviews of this Mayfair chamber have been so mixed that we approached this latest outpost of Alain Ducasse's global empire with some apprehension. As it turned out, needlessly, as the meal we enjoyed was really very enjoyable in a money-no-object sort of way - presumably the niche the place is designed to serve. And the other thing you really need to know? - this place is very French.


The setting is a lofty dining chamber with the odd glimpse of park, but nothing that could be described as a view. There are various design flourishes - curvy screens, a funny green wall with bobbly bits, but the most eye-catching feature is a circular area, screened off by sparkly fibre optic cables, à la Star Trek? The flourishes, however, do not distract from the fact that this is a true foodie temple, conscientiously designed for eating. How many other dining rooms in London have been planned so meticulously that the downlighters - recessed into large mouldings in the ceiling - sit directly over each of the well-spaced tables? (At lunchtime, there's also a good amount of natural light.)


The staff, as confirmed by the only staff member who appeared to be English, are '99% French', and of the more charming variety. Even the sommelier is not at all supercilious. Some reviews have made much of the wine prices here - fairly, in a sense, as many of the prices do indeed run into four figures - but our suggestion of a £40 bottle was happily endorsed. In fact, we'd readily recommend the Austrian red concerned (Zweiberg) to anyone not in search of great weight or complexity.


The table settings are perhaps a touch fussy - do silver-plated mini-salvers really beat china in the side plate department? - but you soon get into the swing of the place, and the general impression after a while is just very comfortable and harmonious. And there was nothing in the dishes presented to disturb such feelings. The food tends to the mildly adventurous, with a good underpinning of Gallic tradition, which is probably as most diners would want it to be.


First out was a small basket of puffed cheese puffs - not especially exciting - followed in quick succession by a plate of vegetable slivers with a couple of options for dipping and dunking them (in the shape of an intense olive-based sauce - like a creamy tapanade - and a creamy, whipped concoction). It couldn't be described as earth-shattering but it makes a pleasing, light warm-up for your tastebuds. A selection of four breads had also arrived, all of them worth a try.


We mixed and matched from the lunch deal (£35) and a la carte (£70). But the former doesn't feel like the poor relation - seared tuna, in particular, came beautifully presented. From the same menu, a plate of winter vegetables made an attractive main course which lost nothing by the absence of protein. In fact, at lunchtime, it's not really evident why you'd ever really need to choose the à la carte.


If you do eat more grandly (from the carte, which has more supplements than you might hope for), the dishes are really not so very different - which is to say they're very good. Squid dumplings were oriental-ish, dense, complex-tasting parcels of flavour, while a more traditional fillet of venison came simply but elegantly adorned.


As is often remarked, however, it's as the meal moves towards its closing phases that the Ducasse experience comes into its own, with a crescendo of dishes reminiscent of the final rockets to make sure you go home wowed by a fireworks display. Having declined cheese, our succession of sweet things included some best-ever macarons (eat your heart out, Ladurée) some beautiful chocolates, and a plate of calorific treats including a gooey, sticky chocolate marshmallow. But we get ahead of ourselves - the actual desserts such as Rum Baba and a health-conscious granita with sorbet and poached fruits (the latter from the tempting lunch menu) started to climb firmly into 'Hall of Greats' territory. And not to forget the final "banger", of course - the little marmalade buns you get presented with at the end of the meal as you wait for your coat for you to enjoy over breakfast the next day.


So, what's not to like about this place? For the most part, the joy of it is that, to a surprising extent - and in spite of its high prices and luxuriousness - it manages to avoid going over the top.


See the Review
53 Park Ln, London, W1K 1QA
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Opening hours
MondayCLOSED
Tuesday12 pm-1:30 pm, 6:30 pm-9:30 pm
Wednesday12 pm-1:30 pm, 6:30 pm-9:30 pm
Thursday12 pm-1:30 pm, 6:30 pm-9:30 pm
Friday12 pm-1:30 pm, 6:30 pm-9:30 pm
Saturday6:30 pm-9:30 pm
SundayCLOSED

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